Physiotherapy is a branch of rehabilitative medicine aimed at helping patients maintain, recover or improve their physical abilities.

Physiotherapists work with patients whose movements may be undermined by aging, disease, environmental factors, or sporting hazards.

A physiotherapist seeks to identify and maximize quality of life and movement potential through prevention, intervention (treatment), promotion, habilitation, and rehabilitation.

Habilitation means making somebody fit or capable of doing something.

Rehabilitation means making somebody fit or capable of doing something they can no longer do properly or at all, but used to be able to – i.e. restoring an ability or abilities.

Promotion means the process of enabling people to increase control over and improve their health.

Physiotherapy is a clinical health science

Physiotherapy is not alternative therapy. It is a clinical health science. Physiotherapists study medical science subjects, including anatomy, neuroscience and physiology in order to acquire the health education needed for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, etc., of patients with physical problems.

A qualified physiotherapist is an expert in the examination and treatment of people with cardiothoracic, musculoskeletal and neuromuscular diseases; focusing on conditions and problems that undermine patients’ abilities to move and function effectively.

Physical therapy is based on science

Physiotherapy is science-based, committed to extending, applying, evaluating and reviewing the evidence that underpins and informs its practice and delivery. The exercise of clinical judgment and informed interpretation is at its core.

What does a physical therapist do?

Physiotherapists use their training and skills to treat a wide range of physical problems linked to different systems in the body, including:

  • Neuromuscular systems – concerned with both nerves and muscles. Nerves include the brain, spine and nerves throughout the body. Neuromuscular refers to neuromuscular junction – where nerves and muscle fibers meet, and also includes neuromuscular transmission – the transfer of information, impulses, from the nerve to the muscle.
  • Musculoskeletal systems – an organ system that gives us the ability to move using our muscles and bones (muscular and skeletal systems). The musculoskeletal system gives us form, movement and stability. The musculoskeletal system includes our bones, muscles, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, joints, and other connective tissue.
  • Cardiovascular systems – include the heart and the circulatory systems. The circulatory system carries nutrients and oxygen via blood vessels to the tissues of the body and removes waste and carbon dioxide from them.
  • Respiratory systems – include organs that are involved in breathing, such as the lungs, bronchi, trachea, larynx, throat, and nose.
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PhysioHealth & Sports Injury Clinic

5/219 Princess Hwy
Corrimal, NSW 2518
Australia
Phone: 02 4207 9999

Physiotherapist helping people in Corrimal,  Corrimal East,  Coniston,  Gwynneville,  Keiraville,  Mangerton,  Mount Keira,  Mount Saint Thomas,  North Wollongong,  West Wollongong,  Wollongong,  Thirroul,  Bulli,  Russell Vale,  Woonona,  Woonona East,  Bellambi,  Tarrawanna,  Towradgi,  Balgownie,  Fairy Meadow,  Fernhill,  Mount Ousley,  Mount Pleasant,  Reidtown,  University Of Wollongong,  Figtree. Act now to improve your physical wellbeing.

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